Tuesday, July 3, 2018

Geoff Anderson's "Humming Dirges"




Quantity



"Anderson possesses a sniper’s eye for detail, filling his poems with taut, after-the-shot tension, which is not a feeling one expects in the parade of neighborhood tales through which he explores the ubiquitous political nature of families or the constantly morphing lessons of loss. Which is not to say this is a collection of haunting dread. There is a joy that moors the reader throughout, making Humming Dirges a collection of art that sorely wants to pick up the pieces it breaks off of you. In Anderson’s world the challenge isn’t simply that nothing is as it at appears, but that there is a lesson in every inch of each tale, even the puzzles missing pieces. Each of the poems presented in Humming Dirges bends to Anderson’s effortless strength at making any seemingly innocent moment turn on a dramatic, sometimes horrible dime. Simply put, Anderson possesses one of the surest, most steady hands I’ve seen commit an act of modern poetry."
- Scott Woods, author of Urban Contemporary History Month and We Over Here Now

"Geoff Anderson makes perfect poems. Emotionally-complicated and precisely-wrought, with images so sharp they might cut you open with their textures, the poems in Anderson’s Humming Dirges gift readers with an inside view of a family as it functions with the outside world and within itself. That is to say, Anderson uses the complexities of family to create a sometimes-uncomfortably accurate portrait of the society in which that family exists. And he’ll draw you in and make you one of his own for as long as the book lasts."
- Louise Robertson, author of The Naming Of and Teaching My Daughter My Language


"These poems view the world with a keen reflective eye. They challenge us to rethink what we've assumed about ethnicity, about loss, about history--the histories we're taught and the histories we live. With artful subtlety, Geoff leaves something distinctly other in the reader's view: Other than common, other than black, than white, than pretense. Frank and delicious."
- Rose M. Smith, Senior Editor, Pudding Magazine